In my last post on FusionPBX I demonstrated the process to build the Debian 8 server that is required as a basis to build a FusionPBX phone server.  In this post I’ll demonstrate the process to follow to build FusionPBX itself.

Now that the Debian host is built I’ll use an SSH client (putty) to connect to the server from my desktop and perform the installation steps.  Using a tool like putty just makes life way easier as I can cut and paste into the putty window.

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I have to login as the “user” we created in the previous post.

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Now that I am logged in I need to give myself “root” privileges (analogous to “administrator” rights on Windows).  I do this by issuing the “su –“ command and then providing the correct password).

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Note how the prompt has changed from a dollar sign $ to a hash mark #.  This is a visual indicator that you are now running as root.

The FusionPBX download site provides the following instructions:

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I’ll perform those steps on my server.

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I already had wget installed as part of my base installation.  Now I’ll get the FusionPBX install script.  I do this by cutting/pasting the “wget” line highlighted in the red box in the FusionPBX download screen above into my putty window.  In case you didn’t know, wget is a tool that allows you to “access” websites from a command line and pull files down from the website.  The wget command that you’re going to issue will pull the FusionPBX install script down from a GitHub repository.

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Now I have to make the script executable.

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And now I run the script.

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The “install-both” tells the script that you want to install the two major pieces, FusionPBX and Freeswitch.  The “auto” tells the script that you don’t want the system to prompt you for anything other than required information.

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The script will run for a considerable period of time, but do keep an eye on it as it will ask you for some information at various points during the build.  The time required for the process to run is very dependant on the speed and power of your Debian server; building on a super fast Xeon will be much faster than on an AMD powered Zotac Zbox.  I have seen builds complete in as little as 12 minutes and as long as an hour or more.  Patience is key!

 

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This is a key piece as the script is asking you for a password to assign to Postgres (this is the SQL database that holds all the info for the FusionPBX system).  Make sure you make note of what you enter here as you will need it again (and it is important to keep this for future reference).

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Still building!  As you can see the system has installed nginx as the webserver to support FusionPBX.

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OK, remember I said to keep note of the Postgres password you created?  Well, you need to supply it again at this screen.

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We have now reached the point where FusionPBX is installed and we have to make the final settings.  Follow the instructions above very carefully.

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Provide a username and a password for a login you want to use as an admin login into your FusionPBX install.  This does not have to match any Linux user.  Also make sure you select postgesql as database type.

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Make sure you set fusionpbx as the Database Username and provide the Postgres password that you recorded (and used twice) earlier in the build process.  When you click Next the system will chug away for a bit then you’ll be at the following screen:

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Now you go back to your putty screen and continue.

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Congrats!  Your server build is complete!  You can login in to the webpage and start poking about.

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In following posts I’ll look at some of the basics of configuring the server for actual use including how to connect to a public SIP provider such as Flowroute, how to set up extensions and users, how to provision phones and more!

FusionPBX–How to build a phone server–Part 2
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